blow (blew, blown)

blow (blew, blown)
صَفَرَ \ blow (blew, blown): (of an instrument) sound by means of a stream of air: The whistle blew. whistle: to make the sound of a whistle: I whistled as I walked along. The wind whistled through the trees.

Arabic-English glossary. 2015.

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  • blow — blow1 [blō] vi. blew, blown, blowing [ME blowen < OE blawan < IE * bhlē : see BLAST] 1. to move with some force: said of the wind or a current of air 2. to send forth air with or as with the mouth 3. to pant; be breathless …   English World dictionary

  • blow — [bləʊ ǁ bloʊ] verb blew PASTTENSE [bluː] blown PASTPART [bləʊn ǁ bloʊn] [transitive] 1. informal if you blow money on something, you spend a lot of money on it, often money that you cannot afford: • He blew his wages on a new stereo …   Financial and business terms

  • Blow — may refer to: *Blowing, or exhalation *Strike (attack) *Drug slang for cocaine * Blow (film), a 2001 American film about drug trafficking * Blow ( My Name Is Earl ), a season 2 episode of My Name is Earl *Blow (drink), a brand of energy drink… …   Wikipedia

  • blow — blow1 /bloh/, n. 1. a sudden, hard stroke with a hand, fist, or weapon: a blow to the head. 2. a sudden shock, calamity, reversal, etc.: His wife s death was a terrible blow to him. 3. a sudden attack or drastic action: The invaders struck a blow …   Universalium

  • blow — I [[t]blo͟ʊ[/t]] VERB USES ♦♦ blows, blowing, blew, blown (Please look at category 15 to see if the expression you are looking for is shown under another headword.) 1) VERB When a wind or breeze blows, the air moves. A chill wind blew at the top… …   English dictionary

  • blow — I [[t]bloʊ[/t]] n. 1) a sudden, hard stroke with a hand, fist, or weapon 2) a sudden shock, calamity, reversal, etc 3) a sudden attack or drastic action • come to blows Etymology: 1425–75; late ME blaw, N form repr. later blowe II blow… …   From formal English to slang

  • blow — I. verb (blew; blown; blowing) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English blāwan; akin to Old High German blāen to blow, Latin flare, Greek phallos penis Date: before 12th century intransitive verb 1. a. of air …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • blow up — {v.} 1a. To break or destroy or to be destroyed by explosion. * /He blew up the plane by means of a concealed bomb./ * /The fireworks factory blew up when something went wrong in an electric switch./ 1b. {informal} To explode with anger or strong …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • blow up — {v.} 1a. To break or destroy or to be destroyed by explosion. * /He blew up the plane by means of a concealed bomb./ * /The fireworks factory blew up when something went wrong in an electric switch./ 1b. {informal} To explode with anger or strong …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Blow — Blow, v. t. 1. To force a current of air upon with the mouth, or by other means; as, to blow the fire. [1913 Webster] 2. To drive by a current air; to impel; as, the tempest blew the ship ashore. [1913 Webster] Off at sea northeast winds blow… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Blew — Blow Blow, v. i. [imp. {Blew} (bl[=u]); p. p. {Blown} (bl[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Blowing}.] [OE. blawen, blowen, AS. bl[=a]wan to blow, as wind; akin to OHG. pl[=a]jan, G. bl[ a]hen, to blow up, swell, L. flare to blow, Gr. ekflai nein to spout… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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